Back Pain: Myth and Facts

Back Pain is Physical discomfort occurring anywhere on the spine or back, ranging from mild to disabling.

Conditions commonly linked to back pain include Muscle or ligament strain. Repeated heavy lifting or a sudden awkward movement can strain back muscles and spinal ligaments. If you’re in poor physical condition, constant strain on your back can cause painful muscle spasms.

Back pain can have causes that aren’t due to underlying disease. Examples include overuse such as working out or lifting too much, prolonged sitting and lying down, sleeping in an uncomfortable position or wearing a poorly fitting backpack.

Myth: Always Sit Up Straight

Slouching is bad. But sitting up too straight and still for long periods can also be a strain on your back. Take breaks a few times a day: Lean back in your chair with your feet on the floor and let your back curve slightly. Even better: Try standing for part of the day, perhaps while you’re on the phone or reading. Using a chair with correct lower lumbar support can help keep your back comfortable.

Tips- sitting all day? Be sure to get up and stretch occasionally.

Myth: Don’t Lift Heavy Things

It’s not necessarily how much you lift, it’s how you do it. Get directly in front of the object. Squat close to it, with your back straight and head up. Stand, using your legs to push up the load and your arms to hold it close to your middle. Don’t twist or bend your body, or you may hurt your back. (Of course, you shouldn’t pick up anything that might be too heavy for you.)

Myth: I must stay in bed and rest

While it can be useful to rest with an acute back injury, this phase only lasts a few days. It is a good idea to stay moving to ensure your muscles stay strong and don’t stiffen up.

you can take it easy for a few days, but lying in bed all day will likely only lengthen the recovery period. By modifying daily activities you can help decrease your back pain long term.

Myth: Applying heat will help a sore back

Applying heat can actually worsen inflammation in the joint and surrounding muscles and ligaments. As a rule of thumb, use ice on any back injury for the first 48-72 hours, then you should alternate between ice and heat, 20 minutes on 20 minutes off. When in doubt about ice and heat, it is always best to take the advice of your physician. inflammation in the joint and surrounding muscles and ligaments. As a rule of thumb, use ice on any back injury for the first 48-72 hours, then you should alternate between ice and heat, 20 minutes on 20 minutes off. When in doubt about ice and heat, it is always best to take the advice of your physician.

Myth: Being overweight doesn’t contribute to my back pain

Extra body weight compresses the spine and squeezes invertebral discs, making an overweight individual more prone to painful back conditions. In addition, high amounts of belly fat can cause poor posture and slouching resulting in back pain. Stay fit by doing back and abdominal exercises to keep the core area of the body strong and healthy. This is an important way to prevent back pain and remain healthy.

Myth: I will just have to live with the pain

You should never just accept pain. It is your body’s way of telling you something is wrong. There are countless options for pain relief. Have regular spinal checkups, a practice recognized self-care and see a health professional.

Myth: I can’t do my favorite activities anymore

If you are experiencing back pain it is important to listen to your body and know your limitations. Take the time to let your body recover and seek medical treatment if needed, but don’t dismay. By following an exercise program that includes core conditioning and flexibility exercises and using good body mechanics, such as correct posture, you can get back to most or all of your favorite activities.

Myth: I have back pain so I will need surgery

Only a very small percentage of people who suffer from back pain will need to undergo surgery. There are a number of alternative treatments for back pain that can be explored with your orthopedic surgeon to avoid surgical procedures, including minimally invasive procedures.

Dr. Sujit Narayana I Consultant – Orthopaedics and Trauma Surgeon I Dharamshila Narayana Superspeciality Hospital, Delhi

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